Presenting the Nominees for the 2017 Marie Taubeneck Award

The Teratology Society is pleased to present the candidates for the 2017 Marie W. Taubeneck Award. Candidate profiles may be viewed HERE.

This award is presented to a student or postdoctoral fellow in recognition of scholarship in teratology and service to the Teratology Society. The Marie W. Taubeneck Fund established in memory of Dr. Taubeneck supports this award.

Eligibility:
This award is open to graduate students and postdoctoral fellows (hereafter “trainees”) who are members of the Society and is based on the following considerations:

  • Level of involvement in the Teratology Society
  • Attendance at a minimum of one Teratology Society meeting
  • Leadership among and mentoring of fellow trainees
  • Level of enthusiasm for developmental and reproductive sciences
  • Courage to pursue new methods and areas of research
  • Is a trainee at the time of nomination

*Leadership among fellow trainees may be demonstrated in any number of ways, both formally and informally. Below are a few examples of the type of leadership and mentoring that help fellow trainees feel welcome and supported in our Society.

  • Actively engaged with fellow trainees at the meeting
  • Facilitate interactions with other trainees
  • Openly share experiences, both positive and negative, with fellow trainees to support, or even commiserate with them
  • Seek out and welcome trainees attending their first meeting
  • Support aspiring scientists in your lab, university or community

Judging process:
A poll will be conducted of all trainees in attendance at the Annual Meeting. The final selection will be made by the Student Affairs Committee taking into consideration the trainee poll and eligibility criteria.

Student and postdoctoral fellows may cast their vote for the 2017 Taubeneck Award at this year’s Annual Meeting in Denver, Colorado.

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